Fahrenheit of the faults the country had made

Fahrenheit 451 Prompt #3Patterns can be found in the continuous mistakes society always seems to make.  Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury, for example, The novel sheds light on conflicts of modern society and its individuals through themes of censorship and knowledge versus ignorance.Fahrenheit 451’s dystopian setting demonstrates modern uses of censorship with the burning of books as well as the history of firemen.  To keep citizens from having their own opinions or reading from the perspectives of other authors, the society burns books and controls the people’s thoughts by regulating what they can see on tv.  Firemen even admit that to them, “it was a pleasure to burn.” (1) more info on quote?or talk about how they made all the citizens watch the big chase Recently, on December 14th of 2017, the FCC’s vote to repeal net neutrality has gotten everyone worried about the future restrictions of the web.   without this law, the government would be able to supervise the websites we are able to view as well as have access to each user’s internet records.  This strongly relates to Fahrenheit 451’s city, which is taken over by government-authorized technology.  Most residents, other than the rare pedestrians such as Clarisse McClellan and her uncle, do not know of how firemen were originally supposed to put out fires.  “They drew forth their rule books, which also contained brief histories of the Firemen of America, and laid them out where Montag, though long familiar with them, might read: Established, 1790, to burn English-influenced books in the colonies.  First Fireman: Benjamin Franklin.” (32)  Many aspects of history are also hidden in current textbooks.  Like the firemen, it makes the government’s actions seem more justified.  For examples, History textbooks aimed towards schools in America usually leave out many details of the faults the country had made throughout history and the suffering they had put other groups(?) through.  Instead, they focus mostly on their own overall successes.While in Fahrenheit 451, scenes of knowledge versus ignorance derive from a lack of exposure to literature, many of our current difficulties are escalated as a result of the internet.  By mildred pushing the idea that the books were rubbish and did not make any logical sense by yelling, “It doesn’t mean anything!” (65) and “Books aren’t people.” (69), she was being ignorant by just not understanding the purpose behind the author’s words.  Today, people exemplify the same ignorance when it comes to other people’s work or belongings.  especially with the internet, billions of people with different opinions and levels of knowledge have the ability to critique the same piece of work without knowing the thoughts behind it, making it inevitable for creators to be victims of ignorant claims/opinions.  Many do not understand that may not resonate with one individual can be the most meaningful to another.  Furthermore, just like how montag was trying to scold mildred’s guests with his new profound sense of compassion and awareness of society by claiming, “Did you hear them, did you hear these monsters talking about monsters?  Oh God, the way they jabber about people and their own children and themselves and the way they talk about their husbands and the way they talk about war, dammit, I stand here and I can’t believe it!” (94), the internet allows people to belittle others with their own self-perceived expertise.  Later in the story, however, Beatty had used his own knowledge against Montag, quoting literature that Montag did not understand (103), proving to Montag that he still has much to learn.  There will always be people who are more knowledgeable than others in a certain field, in this case Beatty, and it is important for them to have ignorant people realize that they do not know everything.Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451 emphasizes powerful topics including censorship and knowledge versus ignorance, as well as its prevalence today.  After the bombing at the end of the novel, Granger had mentioned, “There was a silly damn bird called a Phoenix… every time he burnt himself up he sprang out of the ashes, he got himself born all over again.  And it looks like we’re doing the same thing, over and over, but we’ve got one damn thing the Phoenix never had.  We know the damn silly thing we just did.  We know all the damn silly things we’ve done for a thousand years and as long as we know that and always have it around where we can see it, some day we’ll stop making the goddam funeral pyres and jumping in the middle of them.”  Society will continue to make the same mistakes, but it will eventually grow from them.